Sport Heritage Review

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Me, Lee, and Stories as Sport Heritage

Sport heritage, like most any form of heritage, has many ingredients.  One of the more important aspects are personal memories, where we contextualize our own recollections in terms of broader contexts.  Sometimes this takes the role of a “where were you?” during an important event or moment, but often it is on a much smaller scale, where the heritage is much more at the family or community level.

In any event, a few months back the folks at the Edmonton City as Museum Project (ECAMP) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada asked me to contribute a submission to their website. ECAMP’s role, at present, is to act as a repository for the city’s intangible heritage – the histories, stories, memories, and lore that tell the city’s story – from the infamous to the intimate. I was born and raised in Edmonton and, as such, they felt I might be able to add something sport-based to their collection, particularly as I have been away from the city for a number of years.  Edmonton’s sporting heritage is vast, covering many different sports, athletes, and events throughout its history.  Some of this history, particularly those from the late 1970s through early 2000s are a part of my own story and heritage as well.  And, though I thought about doing a “where were you?” piece – or even a more objective heritage “moment” (such as recapping and recalling particularly famous sporting moments or events), I elected to go with the more community level heritage, and perhaps capture a time when the gulf between professional athletes and working class families wasn’t great at all.

My story, called Me and Lee, is unabashedly sentimental and, as a few former classmates have reminded me, may have happened differently or perhaps not even at all.  I have a strong memory of this particular piece of community lore and my reaction to it and, as a good friend reminded me, memory isn’t subject to facts (nor, often, is heritage).

If you would like to have a read (ECAMP’s website is open access and does not require subscription), please click the link here.

Ramshaw3


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